About your Search

20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40
supporters would not be compromised the ergo they vote for the libertarian ticket, myself and judge jim gray. >> gary johnson, 2012 is the website.com i should say. and here is the cover of governor johnson's new book, "seven principles of good government: liberty, people and politics" out in august of 2012. >> here's a look at books being published this week: >> app next comment richard
wondered if you could go back. you write in the jim crow south, a total daddy's girl, trying to get gangster driving the tractor at 4 years old in the streets in the neighborhood. tell me about that. [laughter] >> we were in baker county, and you hear about and read about the sheriffs of earlier years, but the gater, and the sheriff many that county wanted to be known as the gater. the gater ruled everything, everyone in the county, and you can't imagine looking at the westerns from earlier days, anyone like him, but he was worse than what you've seen in your worse westerns, but growing up in that, we -- my family lived -- my great great grandparents came to baker county. i don't know whether they came they ended up there as sharecroppers with the intent of buying land, and that, they did. they bought enough land that the area where i grew up is still, today, called hawkins town, and there's a lot of family, but it was that way, you know, hawkins in one area and williams in another, all one big family and felt we had to help each other. >> my father was a farmer, and he just kept ha
the madness arena at the university of colorado. im jim lehrer of the pbs "newshour." i welcome you to the 2012 debates between barack obama, the democratic nominee and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate in the next three, two presidential, one vice presidential are sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. tonight's 90 minutes will be about domestic issues that will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15 minute segment with two-minute answers for the first question, then open discussion for the remainder of each segment. thousands of people offered suggestions on segment subjects or questions via the internet and other means, but i made the final selections. and for the record, they were not submitted for approval to the commission or the candidates. the segments as i announced in a van will be three on the economy and one each on health care, the role of government and governing, with an emphasis throughout the difference is, specific century says. both candidates will also have two-minute cl
as chairman david tries chief adviser on committee and leadership that is the to my leftist jim harper, director of information policy studies at the cato institute and is also the founder of washington watchdog, which keeps a very close eye on legislation and federal spending. chimp has asked me to mention washington watch.com several times during the course of the presentation. and last but not least john who is the policy director at the sunlight foundation and all around transparency gaslight. that is part of his official title. there's more information on your chairs. i'd like to thank representatives who are the co-chairs of the congressional transparency caucus. for giving us the space and aberdeen to have a conversation with you here today. like is that i promise i'll be brief and i'm going to turn to our first panelist. >> thanks. thanks, daniel. thanks to you and the advisory committee and the sunlight foundation for having me this afternoon. i'd like to talk with you a little bit about where we've been over the last two years, and they a little bit about where we are headed
. so, i was fascinated by this other character named jim bell whose even more radical than tim if that's possible. he proposed a system he picked of this idea of untraceable payments and he wanted to create a payment program called assassination politics or anybody can make a nation into a digital debt a pool and the money is used to fund the assassinations of political figures. so a million people over in $5 to kill the president through some -- i'm not advocating this if any secret service agents are in the room -- but immediately there is an untraceable collection of $5 million on the president's head. and jim bell believed he could use this system to destroy the government as we know it. he wrote that with perfect anonymity and secrecy and perfect security, combines the risky proposition to even hold a level of office of the commissioner. so, i exchanged letters with jim bell while he was in prison recently for tax evasion and stalking a federal agent. he got out in march actually and he told me when he was in solitary confinement, he came up with a burly and patent idea for a tele
the reagan agenda. jim baker and others, very strong legislative affairs office. and really ability, it was impressive what they did we look back on, picking up 70, 80 democrats in the house. we look at history, reagan won and, therefore, inevitably going to get all the stuff, that's not how the code works. it will be worth looking at those. >> governor ronny wilson have difficulty. just a change of administration. and a confirmation process right now is awful. and so you probably will have to have the new term for czars are, that are in the administration trying to kabul together the jurisdiction of greece agencies to push whatever needs to be done. spent i'd like to involve our audience here, so if you have a question raise your hand. we have a question over here. we have a microphone over here, if you can take it over here. if you can give us your name and your organization. we would ask you to keep your questions brief so we can get to as many people as possible. >> there was al gore's reinventing government, but really what it comes down, no matter who is elected, the president
to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami university of ohio and who is a quarterback , been in office burger of that team purpose per that shall not otherwise be named. so that's a little presidential trivia for you, and i also always give a little mix and stir when i come back. thinking to prepare my remarks when latter is being built. sandino's as well as i do. the real director of the nixon library was richard nixon. he designed and oversaw it and every detail was of interest to him. but probably the thing he was least interested in was a room which is even here anymore, the domestic policy room which has been redone. the league kind of such a together at the last minute. one of those exhibits was about the endangered species act. president nixon as you may or may not know, greatest of a terminal president in the history of the united states son and heir the cl
obama and mitt romney meet in the first presidential debate. jim lehrer moderates from the university of denver. watch and engage with see them with our life in the brig at 7 p.m. eastern followed by two ways to watch the debate at nine. on c-span both candidates on screen the entire debate. on c-span2 a multi-camera version of the debate. and following, your reactions, calls, e-mails and tweet. follow our live coverage on c-span, c-span radio and online at c-span.org. >> ahead of the food and drug administration spoke at a conference on counterfeit prescription drugs. she discussed the new fda initiative to educate consumers, called bsafe our ex. this conference was hosted by the partnership for safe medicine. the fda commissioner's remarks are 20 minutes. >> thank you. it's really a pleasure to be here once again with the partnership for safe medicines. this is a really important topic to me personally and professionally, and really given our shared shared commitment to make our nation drug supply safe, effective, secure and high quality as possible, the work with a partnership is v
presidential debate. the news hours jim lehr moderates. watch and engage with c-span including the live debate preview at 7 p.m. eastern, debate at 9, and post debate, calls, reactions, e-mails, and tweets. follow our coverage on c-span, c-span radio, and online at c-span.org. now on booktv, peter takes about why our economy produces great wealth and great poverty at the same time. he offers suggestions on how to improve the conditions on tens of millions of americans living below the poverty line. this is about 50 minutes. >> well, thank you so much, debra. i am totally delighted to be here and thanks to busboys and poets for allowing me to be here, to talk with you, and, of course, thanks to all of you for coming. i see a lot of -- a lot of friends, some of my students are here. they already got their grades so no -- [laughter] nobody was threatened. this is -- we could spend a lot of time talking about how bad things are now, but we all know. it's a terrible time for a lot of reasons, and especially for low and lower income people and in our country, both directly and because of what's happ
. on the committee is served us chief advisor. immediately to my left is jim harper, director of policy studies at the cato institute and also the founder of washington watch.com, which keeps a close eye on legislation and federal funding. jenna sasser to mention washington watch.com at least several times during the course of this presentation. last but not least is john wonderlich, policy director at all about transparency guide. that is his official title. more information about today's panel under chairs and also at transparency cockiest.org. i would like to thank representative issa andrew gray, cochairs of the congressional congress for giving us the space to have >> thanks, daniel. thanks to you and the advisory committee and the sunlight foundation for having me this afternoon. i would like to talk with you about where we've been over the last two years and maybe a little bit about where we are headed in the relatively near future. you know, about this time, two years ago, our political folks were starting to make noise, but there was certainly possible if not likely the republicans wer
possibili possibility, as jim woolsey came up with this one, the talk, i heard jim speak in the spring. he said what do you do if you have one of these geomagnetic solar storms. and if we had one as powerful as in 1859 it could zip out the entire infrastructure. so how do you negotiate with the sun? for those who want to negotiate a way this threat. but at least the iranian threat, missile defense can, if properly deployed, can enable us to shoot down a small attack of this kind. the current generation missile defense, not designed to shoot down a trajectory that goes up like this, but rather midcourse. so we would have to work on it but you would have a picket fence to try to prevent a catastrophic strike. at the same time we invest a few billion dollars, you can get back up your electrical systems. right now it would be several years before major transformers are brought back online. so the lesson out of this is that catastrophic vulnerability, low number catastrophic vulnerability is something you should never permit if you can avoid it. and, of course, i did mention at the end of the i
as if they were on mars. jim rice, a geologist on a mission, said i put myself out there, with two boots on the ground trying to figure out where to go and what to do. how to make that what we are observing with the instruments. day in and day out it was always a perspective of being on the surface, and trying to draw on your own field experience in places that might be similar. and astrobiologist at nasa ames described it this way. they had these huge charts on the wall, engine drawings of the rover. with all of these dimensions, we would have some geometric question. well, can we see this? can we reach that? is this rock going to be in shade, or will it be in the sun? we would go and we would stand and stare at those charts. and overtime we stopped doing it so much because we begin to gain a sense of the body. that's projecting your self into the rover. it's just an amazing capability of the human mind that you can sort of retool your self. so acting through the robots they controlled, the scientists look around, they manipulate materials and they move over the landscape. they may pret
because of your color. ..merica, robert [applause] >> thank you. jim, thank you. that was such a wonderful introduction. in fact, it was such a wonderful introduction it reminds me of what johnson said when he got a nice introduction. he said he wished his parents were alive to hear it. [laughter] because his father would have loved it, and his mother would have believed it. [laughter] you know, when winston churchill was writing, he was asked how he was coming along, and he said,ce i'mst working on the 5th of the projected four volume. [laughter] well, i'm not comparing myselfof to wipe stone church hill, but with regard to the lyndon johnson biography, we're sort of in the same boat. i've been writing about johnson so long people askre me, don't u get bored? the answer is that the very opposite is true. one reason they are not about lyndon johnson, i never had the slightest interest in writing a book just to tell the life of a famous man. from the moment i first thoughte of doingrt books, i thought of i biographies -- i thought of biographies as a way of examining the great forces that s
matters. immediately to my left is jim helprin the director of information policy studies at the cato institute and the founder of washington watch.com which keeps a close eye on legislation and federal spending. jim is also -- washington watch.com and we several times during the course of this presentation. and last but not least is john wonderlich the policy director of the sunlight foundation and all around -- that is actually the official title. there is more information about today's panelists and our transparency caucus.org. is like to thank represented eyes and quickly who are the co-chairs of the congressional transparency caucus for giving us the space in the opportunity to have a conversation with you here today. like is i is that i promised i would be brief and i'm going to turn to our first panelist, hugh please. >> thanks daniel. thanks to you in the advisory committee and the sunlight foundation for having me this afternoon. i would like to talk with you a little bit about where we have been over the last two years and maybe a little bit about where we are headed and in
to know in his quarter century as the country's go to referee for the presidential debate. mr. jim lehrer the former anchor of pbs news hour has been seizing outreach by the suggestion that he was as safe and uninspired choice to moderate the first debate and he's offended by the reports that question whether the 12 presidential debate might bone too many. they say in this election living by a journalist doctrine of disengagement of reporter is never the story that has been harder than ever especially for those moderating debates. they go to because reassure the individual will be the moderators. we see martha raddatz but correspondent for abc news and will moderate the vice presidential debate and is the only moderator chosen who is not an anchor. candy crowley the host of the state of the union program on cnn will host one of the debates, and bob schiffer the cbs correspondent and a host of face the nation. tomorrow night they are hosting -- there are other stories in the people looking at the candidates and to do. "the chicago tribune" says the gop may hinge on the debate in showdown c
hours. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i'm jim marshall the new president of the substitute of peace. i'm delighted to tell you. and i'm also pleased that everyone is here today for a very important -- to hear about a important project that has been sponsored. my job is to introduce steven heydemann. steve is the senior adviser for middle east initiative. he taught at colombia. he is published and directed if the senator for democracy and civil society at georgetown university. steve is terrific asset to the institute. the project is one that it driven by syrians. with assistance technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute in a sister constitution in germany. it's very important that these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations. things that are handed down from the united states typical don't work all that well. and so we are very pleased that you're all here. i hope you have lots of questions. and steve, if i can turn this over to you. >> thank you very much. thank you very much for opening us this morning. and
in private-sector jobs that pay good money but jim messina the campaign manager will tell you that allow them to be smarter and get smarter so more data can get in and more models and projections and that it pays for itself. >> host: i think we are going to take a break now and we will be right back. >> host: i think of microtargeting. everybody has heard the phrase. can you just explain what is microtargeting exactly and how is it used in these campaigns? >> guest: sure. the biggest, there are two types of communications. there is mass media with the candidate talking and trying to get stories in the newspaper and the paid media which for the last half-century has been tv and radio ads. those are very crudely targeting certain media markets or a certain time of day or on certain channels that you can do a lot more specificity than that. the other type of communication is voter contact, talking to individual voters where you know who you want to talk to any talk about specific messages or target get out the vote reminders to them. either you can put together what campaigns call a universe of
or are they being more clear eyed in the assessment of it? >> they're being more clear eyed, jim. some private grumbling about jim lehrer. you're hearing some people say with the halperin quote you said, kind of downplaying the significance of this thing. most people made up their minds. you're hearing what mike mentioned a few minutes ago, people saying yeah, romney did well stylelisticly but not substantively. i can tell you on the republican side i'm sensing real confidence. the republicans are the first people to get in the spin room. they came pouring in with their placards during the closing statements. obama people came a couple minutes later much more aggressive. i've been trying not to just talk to romney campaigners and republicans not closely associated with romney campaign people like al cardenas, chairman of the american conservative union, rudy giuliani, not always a mitt romney fan. they're all telling me they really think the dynamic of the race shifted a little bit. we'll see how much. the spirit is high among republicans and it seems relatively authentic. >> james writes a pr
under assad's control. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall. i am pleased that everyone is here today for a very important project. it has been sponsored by the institute of peace. my job is to introduce steve heideman. he is our senior advisor for middle east initials. he is extensively published and has taught at columbia and at the civil society at georgetown university. this project is one that is driven by syrians. with assistance and other kinds of assistance from sister institutions in germany. it is important these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations. things that are handed down from the united states typically don't work all that well. we are very pleased with all of you here. i hope you have lots of questions. steve, if i could turn this over to you. >> thank you very much for opening up this morning. let me add my welcome. we are delighted to see you all here this morning. it is going to be a very interesting conversation about syria and the challenges of managing a post assad transistor. as jim mentioned, this event is the culminatio
morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states that typically don't work all that well and so we are very pleased that you're all here. i hope you have lots of questions and steve if i could turn this over to you. >> thank you very much gem for opening this
of indianapolis, indiana. i was especially pleased to meet with jim most reflate in august during the american legion's 94th national convention in indianapolis. where he was elected to serve as national commander. he brings a wealth of experience to this post. this includes his own service, united states army in vietnam, more than two decades in the private sector with mx coal country. his election as a county commission in worked county, indiana, and his service to veterans of our state as a member and president of the indiana veterans affairs commission. i'm confident the talent and diligence he has exemplified have been the hallmark of his career to date, and they will continue to will serve the american legion during his term of office. i would like to again thank the leadership and members of the respective veterans' affairs committee assembled here today for calling this important hearing. i wish jim and his wife, vicki, every success, and they're important service to the 2.4 million veterans that make up the american legion. and i look forward to learning much more about the american l
for voters who would like to see us return to the good old days of jim crow. >> yeah, we are really anti-black. colonel allen west is anti-black, connie rice's anti-black, they are all publicly anti-black. msnbc daytime anchor. yes, i want you to note that. he's an actual anchor on this network that i used to work for called msnbc. his name is thomas roberts and he was online september 23rd to comment on the previous night gop debates. and when i think about msnbc time i actually think of how many people work on each of their shows. and i think there are more staffers working for the shows than there are people watching the shows. and nevertheless, mr. roberts takes it away. >> i get out of all of these things for many candidates have rather take legislation to build a time machine and go back in time to where we had, you know, no women voting, slavery was cool. >> in other words, republicans are troglodytes. liberals are so perpetually better informed. tom roberts. our third and final nominee for the 2012 dishonors knuckle drag her award is an well, how can it not be? i don't know about
. and now i'd like to hand the floor over to jim corpsville of stony brook university who will lead our plenary panel asking, is this any way to cover an election? >> thank you, a.j., and good morning to everybody. we have a very distinguished and knowledgeable panel to talk about this topic, the timing, obviously, couldn't be better, debates wednesday night. let me introduce the people on the panel. to my immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint presentation to make to us. to my immediate left is amy davidson, senior editor at the new yorker. she's been at the magazine since 1995, writes a blog and contributes to the magazine's pages. next is anna sale who's a political reporter for wnyc radio politics site, it's a free country.org. she covered the gop primaries, my condolences -- [laughter] and focuses on swing states far away from political ralli
light falls on a moderator jim lehrer his house page piece in the newspaper one goal achieved perhaps to stay out of the way. he writes the critiques came from several sides of the media spectrum of leader the complaints seemed the loudest from the left. and more he put out a comment yesterday in response to the critique, and here is the "washington post" this morning. he sent this e-mail that said i thought the format accomplished its purpose which was to facilitate the direct exchanges between the candidates about issues of substance, he said in a statement e-mail on thursday. part of the moderator mission was to stay out of the way, and i had no problem with doing so. the only personal frustration was discovering that 90 minutes was not enough time and that more open format to cover every issue that deserved attention. one of the issues was of course the role of the government, and so we are asking you to tell us about this morning. next is a call from tama in washington. republican. good morning. >> caller: good morning. i think the will of the government is to do big things like
of independence said so. may have taken a war and slave and jim crow laws but no matter how contradictory that was, here was this document. it starts and you look at that got me started again to read this great document. to read it and talk about it. i wasn't going to be a judge. who knows how i became a judge? i was only interested in the best of this country. the things that made it worth happening. and low and behold you come to the understanding that the founding document, this great experiment is a wonderful thing and that was in the 1980s. i was worrying more about budgets and getting in all sorts of trouble over age destroyers and -- none of which was of great consequence as far as the structure of the country but spending hour after hour learning about the things you write about and teach so eloquently, for me that central document is great and wants the declaration of independence and to then go to gettysburg and to think about the effect's charge, think about the carnage, lives lost, battles before fredericksburg, wilderness and chancellor and shiloh and manassas, all these battles where
this by looking, i spent time in the house jim and talk to members and a lot of them are very frustrated by the pressure, you know, not to cooperate, not to be collegial and some of them lose their careers. so we have got to create support. we've got to change the incentive system and support those people who are willing to say we're one country, let's find a way to work together. >> l. tucker, i worked in the white house counsel's office during the making of this tradition. there is a lot of merida much you have to say it pours, but i don't know how you change the system. you know, the parties -- anyone can create a party. ross perot had his party, but he didn't have enough interest in him to get elected. and so, at first you have to have someone is that's going to create enough interest to rival the democrat and republican party. and i don't see that happening. that's going to take a lot of money, and a lot of organization and an individual that can rally people around him because the independents -- to talk about the independents actually having more people than the republicans and de
and basically went out in a car with jim gallagher, go to the school and the personally interviewed a lot of these men. not the man who came in through other means, such as eddie who came in an athletic scholarship, and i think this -- there we go. i sat in a coffee shop one night and decided he was going to get in, the two of them. and then he presented a bill who was a president at the time, which was for a college at the time, it was quite a cross to bear. what he was looking for, i asked him, how do you decide? anyone who is a parent in the room knows that intelligence is not necessarily something that is a hallmark of success. when you talk to father brooks, he was looking for leadership qualities and was looking for driving people who have work ethic. people who were hoping to reach beyond their grasp, black-and-white, and if you may not know, he was also fighting to get women in the college. sadly, for the class of 1972, i do not believe they arrived until after the fall of that year. that was after president brooks said he managed to shake up the trustee board and get some people
and fox news became a republican jim, and msnbc became a liberal channel. and so you have people getting information that was as different as the political views but and i think that contribute to polarization but i think it's a great question and i don't really have, these are ideas but i don't have a complete answer for you. >> do you have an idea that chief justice roberts feels about citizens united? >> i know he voted for it. and, that's a pretty good tipoff right there. [laughter] you know, and he, i talk about this in "the oath." there was a case out of arizona about a public finds, sort of a successor case, not as big a deal by people asking are they going to cut back on citizens united? are they embarrassed? are the words? no. if you believe that money is speech, and that's more important frankly than the appropriations, but if you believe that money is speech, you pretty much have to deregulate the american campaign. any attempt to limit how much money you can give, to whom you can give money. so i think if the court remains as currently configured we are going to see more deci
five leader that is described in jim collins good to great books. that's not because he doesn't have an ego but his ambition is first and foremost for his institution, his agency and not himself and he ends by years of his team to reflect the philosophy. over the years he has gained respect within all persons of the federal government to deal with cybersecurity if she is routinely sought after for his prelude opinion on all things cyber, and that is why the potomac institute asked him to kick off this event. a humbled inspiration inspirational leader with technical expertise to understand the most complicated cybersecurity subjects, politically savvy to make his team sensitive to all of the varied perspectives and vision to directly support his agency's since philadelphia it doesn't get any better than this beautiful ladies and gentlemen, george dennis bartko. [applause] >> thank you for that very kind and generous introduction. and also, thank you to the potomac institute for the invitation to be here as a part of this great panel and all of the folks that are here. as the director
you, jim. the republicans meant a great deal before he left, both the week prior, during about what requirements going back home, the only requirement that the people want is that congress be here working. we are here and prepared to work. 14 million people that are out of work demand that congress be here working so that we can put donation back to work. we just came from a conference that was most informative than personal. people.com want to see if you're working because they understand on a very personal level what this means as the leader says one medicare, social security, and in fact obamacare are all on the ballot and what that is to the american people. we are here to work. now the vice chair of the caucus, xavier becerra. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i would like to echo what those who have spoken before me have said they simply reiterating some in that we all know. if you believe in america, you invest in america. not in the cayman islands, not in swiss bank accounts, that here in america. the president made this clear in his state of the union address some of the year ago
away from jim crow. i think the black community is more tentative to push the way i think we need to if this president gets reelected. >> i think you're right. we are pushed from the inside more than from the outside. and another four years i think we would tend to push more from the outside. you talked earlier -- >> another four years? >> the next four years. the one following -- >> you said four more years. >> no, no. [laughter] spent we have concentrated -- >> a big difference. >> right. you talked about our probably thinking more in terms of national elections then those. it's been a matter of resources. to use the national congress of black women has been organizing over these three years, as we only had maybe 20 or less chapters three years ago, four years ago. we have 100 no. we are more equipped to work on the local level and we have many black women that we're pushing in local and congressional elections. >> i want to bring up what the spring marches we saw 2006. i moderated an event, i think alice, your group, media folks in las vegas. and i pushed them and i challenged
that we currently use. >> dennis. >> just add on to what jim said, talk about some of the attributes of cyberspace from the beginning and one was continual change. agreeing with a role of test and evaluation we also have to put that in the context that cyberspace is continually changing as are the objects or things it is made up of. so you may test and evaluate at one moment but with upgrades, changes, as was mentioned by melissa on the cyber update tuesdays or whatever, the devices themselves are often morphing and changing substantially. so one has to factor that into the discussion as well with. >> think there was one over here behind the stanchion to me. >> hi, i'm sidney freedberg from aol defense hiding behind the pillar here. a twofold question. one is, obviously there is a lot to talk about counterfeit parts and so forth. we all have concern about that. how many cases and how severe the cases have we actually had date there was a chip calling home as it were to some nefarious actor? or was it simply a matter of it's counterfeit but actually represents that malign threat that
ben davis and jim davis won a seat of the city council of new york. you might be interested into aspects of benjamin davis, city council member. he was black, he was an african-american, and he was an enthusiastic public leader of the united states coming in and he was elected because of proportional representation. there is another returned to new york city, but we have had it. greece has it. so la cerise got only 3%. they had only 2728%, they came in with 2425%. but under greek law whatever party comes in first not only gets the percentage of the popular vote, but an extra 52 that is only reason one reason they got it by this rule, which is designed to favor the party that comes in first there is a strong, old, deeply rooted party, i think they get about 8% of the vote. one third of the voters in greek voted extreme left wing hostility to the capitalist' agrees. that is a sign of greece and a reaction to the change that is taking place. second country, they have had free elections this year. in the first election for the upper house of their national party, the socialist p
presidential debate tomorrow at the university of denver. the live debate gets underway at 7 eastern, and jim leher moderates, and after the debate, your reactions and comments taking your calls, e-mails and tweets on c-span, c-span radio, and online at c-span.org. >> i have all the channels, house, senate, plus author and book review, speeches, those kinds of things.ao if i know a bill's coming up on the floor in the house, i watch, you know, which channel want to see because i have them all. if there is either a speech i know that you've covered or a book review or so on, i'm going to watch that. when i want to find out something that has some value to it, that's going to be one of the first places i look. i mean, i'm obviously a public broadcasting fan. i watch those channels. out of a couple hundred channels, i probably have five to ten at the most i go to. it's going to include all the c-span channels. >>> david brugger watches c-span on direct tv. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> agenting faa administ
meet in their presidential debate, moderated by jim lehrer of the news hour. watch and engage with c-span, including a live debate preview. after the debate, your reactions, calls, e-mails and suites. follow us on c-span, c-span radio and at c-span.org. >> the federal aviation administration is planning on ground-based radar to transition to gps. the subject of nextgen was discussed at a house subcommittee hearing. this will be two hours. >> the hearing will commence. my colleague is here shortly. but i will begin with my opening statement and i suspect that by the time i finished, we will be able to benefit from that as well. today, the subcommittee will hear from governments in the aviation industry stakeholders on the faa's management and progress toward transforming our nations air-traffic control system. this program, known as nextgen, is the largest and most ambitious public works project in our nations history. successful implementation is critical to the future of our air transportation system and u.s. competitiveness in the global marketplace. today, air traffic control syst
. >> next wednesday, street, mitt romney and obama meet in the first presidential debate. moderated by jim lehrer from the university of denver. the debate at 9:00 p.m. and after the debate, your reactions, calls, e-mails and tweets. call us on c-span radio and online at c-span.org. >> this panel discusses the high school graduation rates. this is approximately one-hour. >> good morning. [inaudible] we all form together a governing advisory council. the guidance anticipation of that council has for about provided a wide range of experience, viewpoints and expertise, and gives the hamilton project a pragmatic and very special perspective on policy issues. we conducted extensive outreach to the government and the media. our events involve policy papers as indicates today, they are subject to rigorous review. we believe that the objectives of economic policy should be growth, widespread increases in income, and economic security is also the least that all of these objectives reinforce each other. we also believe in market-based economics, and equally in a strong government to perform the func
and mitt romney meet in the first presidential debate. news hour jim moderates from the university of denver. watch and debate with c-span followed by two ways to watch the debate at nine. on c-span both candidates on screen the entire debate. and on c-span2, the multicamera version of the debate. and following, your reactions, calls, e mailings and and tweets. follow the live coverage on c-span, c-span radio and online at c-span.org. see the first presidential debate love on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org. watch and engage. coming up tonight, the carnegie endowment for international peace hosts a decision discussion on the role of the u.s. president in the world and declining. eric can ton faces his economic challenger in a seventh district debate. that's followed by libertarian presidential candidate gary johnson on the obstacle of faces a third party candidate. >>> on washington journal tomorrow morning, we'll exam the health care law that presidential candidates mitt romney signed in to law when he was governor of massachusetts. our guests is boston herald reporting christ
was pretty -- i was stunned at how the moderator, jim lehrer, let himself get walked over by the candidates in terms of the timing. it was like the two minutes didn't matter. barack obama woods along. when i'm about to die i want barack obama's five seconds because they lasted forever. [laughter] on the other hand, i thought it was pretty good. there's so much policy in this debate. both of these people show they are very smart people and that they both you know can be president, won by virtue of being present in the other by virtue of -- i don't know if there are differences in the formats in the next two. i haven't looked that far ahead. but, i thought it worked out really well in terms of the back-and-forth. it was more of a gnat -- actual debate then a dinner talk or something. >> i think as they political follower like all of you are, i like to the elastic time constraints. i think sometimes in too many debates, i mean just let them talk. i don't think the format of the debate affected the performance of either candidate. it was what it was. i think mr. lehrer did a terrific job and i
in the first presidential debate, the news hours jim lehrer potteries from the university of denver. watch engage with c-span with our live debate preeta at 7 p.m. eastern followed by two ways to watch the debate at nine. on c-span both candidates on screen the entire debate, and on c-span2, a multi-camera version of the debate. and following your reaction, calls, e-mails and tweets. all our live coverage on c-span, c-span radio and online at c-span.org. >> now a debate between republican congressman steve king, and his democratic challenger christie vilsack. they are running to represent iowa's new fourth congressional district. christie vilsack is the wife of former iowa governor and current agriculture secretary tom vilsack. the debate was recently held at northwestern college, christ chapel, in orange city. and it comes to you courtesy of ktiv-tv of sioux city. is a little under an hour. >> now here is the moderator, of the ktiv news for. >> and good evening, everyone. welcome to christ chapel on the campus of northwestern college here in orange city, iowa, were the fourth district con
be the model before he decided he didn't like the reagan agenda, and jim baker and others in the white house knew what they were doing, very strong legislative affairs office and really the ability to -- we look back picking up 70 or 80 democrats in the house even though it was a pretty strong speaker and, you know, being able to get that stuff through -- we look at history retrospective reagan won the and he's never going to get all this stuff through. that is and how the world works and the fact that he did was pretty startling looking at that as a model i suppose. >> governor romney is also going to have a difficulty, just a change in the administration. and the confirmation process now is just awful, you probably will have to have those whatever the new term for czars are that are in the administration trying to cobble together this jurisdiction of the agency's to push a lever needs to be done. >> i would like to involve the audience comes if you have a question raise your hand. we have a microphone over here if you can take it over here. if you can give your name and your organization.
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)